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TitanHQ Recruits 12 New High Profile Staff Members in Response to Blistering U.S. Growth

Less than two months after hiring channel chief Jeff Benedetti, TitanHQ has announced 12 further strategic new hires who will form a new North American team to service the US and Canadian Managed Service Provider (MSP) market.

The new team members have extensive channel experience, having previously held positions at the likes of Datto, Skout Cybersecurity, Agile Blue, and Barracuda and are based in TitanHQ’s new North American base in Shelton, Connecticut, headed up by Channel Chief Benedetti.

The new team includes Eric Morano, who has been appointed Director of Channel Development. Eric has 15 years of sales leadership and GTM experience at Datto, Skout Cybersecurity (BarracudaMSP), AgileBlue XDR, CDW, and Verizon. Moreno will be responsible for optimizing TitanHQ’s partner engagement and growth.

New Channel Account Managers include Craig Somma, who has 25 years of technology sales GTM leadership that was gained at Tech Dept, Micro Warehouse, and Gov Connection, Joseph Rende who has 10+ years of channel sales experience at Gartner and Datto, Pat DeAngelis who has 10+ years of MSP technology experience at Datto, Threatlocker and Armor Cybersecurity, and Jeff Brown has 10+ years of sales experience at Datto, SKOUT Cybersecurity, Agile Blue. New Account Executives include Alex De Los Santos, who has 8 years of sales experience at Datto and ADP, Alex Nankervis, who has 8 years of sales experience at Datto and Indeed, Kyle Leyerzapf, who has 5 years of sales experience at Datto, Patrick Barry who has 6 years of sales and accounts experience with Accu-Tech Corporation and Maxim Healthcare, and Jamal Ibrahim, who has 4 years account management experience with Altium and RCG. Marc Bonnaci has also joined the Sales Development team and has 7 years of sales and professional experience most recently at Agile Blue.

The new TitanHQ North American Team

The past three months have seen significant activity at TitanHQ. In addition to bringing in Benedetti to head the channel team, TitanHQ launched its SpamTitan Plus Anti Phishing solution in December 2021 and announced the acquisition of Cyber Risk Aware in February, and launched SafeTitan Security Awareness Training.

SpamTitan Plus is a cutting-edge, AI-driven anti-phishing solution with more comprehensive “zero-day” threat protection and intelligence than all of the current market leaders, with significant uplifts in phishing link detections and much faster detection speeds. This new addition to the SpamTitan product family has been very well received.

Cyber Risk Aware is a global leader in security awareness training to mitigate human cyber risk, and the platform is used by many companies to train their workforces to improve threat awareness. The platform, which has been re-launched as SafeTitan, is an intuitive, real-time security awareness training platform that improves awareness and human resilience to ransomware, malware, BEC attacks, and phishing. Demand for the new SafeTitan security awareness training and phishing simulation platform has been exceptional, with huge interest coming from MSPs and IT departments globally.

On top of these major launches, TitanHQ recorded record-breaking growth in January and February 2022 and has generated the highest revenue and new MSP partner figures in its 20-year history. More than 2,200 MSPs now use TitanHQ’s best-in-class SaaS Cybersecurity Platform daily, with the numbers continuing to grow at an incredible rate, especially in the United States and Canada, hence the need to open a new U.S. office and bring in a wealth of new talent.

Lapsus Ransomware Gang Ups the Ante with Impresa and NVIDIA Attacks

The Lapsus ransomware gang has arrived on the scene and has already claimed several high-profile targets, with victims including Impresa – the largest media conglomerate in Portugal, Brazil’s Ministry of Health (MoH), the Brazilian telecommunications operator Claro, and most recently, the Santa Clara, CA-based GPU vendor NVIDIA.

The Lapsus ransomware gang – also referred to as Lapsus$ – is a relatively new threat actor and is making a reputation for itself in an already crowded ransomware market. Most ransomware gangs now practice double extortion, where prior to encrypting files they exfiltrate sensitive data and threaten to publish the data if the ransom is not paid. Triple extortion tactics are now becoming common, where threats are also issued to notify shareholders, partners, and customers about attacks. The Lapsus gang has taken things a step further still and is boasting about its attacks and causing major embarrassment for victims.

In January, the Lapsus ransomware gang attacked the Brazilian car rental firm Localiza, which is one of the largest car rental firms in South America. In addition to stealing data and encrypting files, the gang redirected the company’s website to an adult website and publicly announced that the company is now a porn site. The redirection was only in place for a few hours, but it was enough to damage the company’s reputation.

Also in January, Impresa was targeted. Impresa is the owner of SIC and Expresso, the largest TV channel and weekly newspaper in Portugal. The attack targeted Impresa’s online IT servers resulting in company websites being taken offline and the temporary loss of Internet streaming services. The gang defaced the company’s websites by adding their ransom note and claimed they had taken control of Impresa’s Amazon Web Services account. The gang then used the hijacked Expresso Twitter account and sent a tweet stating, “Lapsus$ is officially the new president of Portugal.” The gang also gained access to its newsletter and sent phishing emails to subscribers informing them in the emails that the President of Portugal had been murdered.

On February 25, NVIDIA experienced a cyberattack that saw parts of its IT infrastructure taken offline for a couple of days. NVIDIA announced that it was investigating a security incident, and then the Lapsus gang said it was behind the attack and issued a threat to leak around 1TB of data. The gang published screenshots indicating they had leaked password hashes for NVIDIA employees, source code, and highly sensitive proprietary company information.

There was some good news – the Lapsus gang then experienced its own ‘ransomware’ attack. There have been reports in the media that NVIDIA hacked back and gained access to the attackers’ virtual machine and encrypted its data, although security research Marcus Hutchins offered an alternative view, suggesting this could have been due to the gang installing Nvidia’s corporate agent on their virtual machine and then triggering a data loss prevention policy.

In addition to demanding a ransom, the Lapsus ransomware gang also demanded NVIDIA remove its lite hast rate (LHR) limitations on its GeForce 30 series firmware – which halve the hash rate when it detects the GPUs are being used for mining Ethereum – and also requested NVIDIA commits to completely open source their GPU drivers forever. If the demands are not met, the gang said it will release the complete silicon, graphics, and computer chipset files for its most recent GPUs.

While many ransomware gangs are focused purely on extortion, the Lapsus gang appears to like the limelight and brags about their attacks, which makes attacks by the gang even more serious for victims due to the brand and reputation damage they cause.

The extent of the attack vectors used by the gang is not known, but they appear to have used phishing emails to gain access to some victims’ networks, including the attack on Impresa. Phishing is a popular attack vector in ransomware attacks. Around half of all ransomware attacks start with a phishing email, according to a recent Statista survey. Employees respond to phishing emails and disclose their credentials, which give the attackers the foothold in the network they need for a deeper compromise.

Businesses could be lulled into a false sense of security with the disbanding of major ransomware operations and arrests of key gang members. The REvil ransomware gang may be no more, and DarkSide has been shut down, but other ransomware gangs are more than happy to plug the gap. Lapsus only announced its presence on the scene at the start of the year but is already growing into a major threat.

The best defense against Lapsus ransomware attacks and other cyberattacks is to adopt a defense-in-depth strategy. That should include an advanced spam filtering solution to block email phishing attacks, content filtering to prevent employees from visiting malicious websites, multi-factor authentication on all email accounts and local/cloud apps, ensuring patches and software updates are applied promptly, and providing ongoing security awareness training to the workforce to help employees identify and avoid phishing and social engineering attempts.

TitanHQ can help organizations improve their defenses against the full range of cyberattacks by providing advanced cybersecurity solutions for SMBs, enterprises, and Managed Service Providers, including spam filtering, DNS filtering, email encryption, email archiving, and security awareness training.

LinkedIn Phishing Attacks Soar as Scammers Take Advantage of “The Great Resignation”

Microsoft may be the most impersonated brand in phishing attacks, but the impersonation of LinkedIn is also common and there has been a massive increase in phishing attacks spoofing the professional networking platform in recent weeks.

LinkedIn is an ideal brand to impersonate in phishing attacks and now is the perfect time to be running phishing campaigns due to the Great Resignation. For those unaware of the term, the Great Resignation is a phenomenon where record numbers of employees quit their jobs. The term was coined in May 2021 by Professor Anthony Klotz of Texas A&M University, who predicted that when the pandemic ends there will be a mass exodus of people leaving their jobs.

While there were mass layoffs as a result of the pandemic, many workers who retained their jobs chose not to leave due to the uncertainty of the job market, but now many workers who are not living from paycheck to paycheck are reconsidering their positions. There has certainly been an upward trend in workers voluntarily leaving their jobs since the start of 2021, indicating the great resignation has begun.

LinkedIn is used by job seekers to identify contacts, network, research companies, and find new employment opportunities. A phishing email that spoofs LinkedIn and indicates a potential employer has been reading a user’s profile, shows a message has been sent through the platform, or advises the user about a new job opportunity is likely to be clicked.

LinkedIn phishing campaigns are helped by the regular email communications from LinkedIn advising users of the platform of the number of searches they appeared in, new messages, and alerts about jobs. That means that users of the platform are used to receiving regular communications from the platform, so if a phishing email is received that looks exactly like a LinkedIn communication, there is likely to be less scrutiny of the email that there would be of an email from a platform that rarely communicates with users via email.

The latest LinkedIn phishing campaign uses HTML templates that include the LinkedIn logo and the color scheme used in official LinkedIn communications. The emails also have the same footer as genuine email communications from the platform, including the correct address and unsubscribe option. The display name is spoofed to make it appear as if the emails are official communications; however, closer inspection will reveal the emails have been sent from webmail addresses.

The phishing emails include subject lines such as “Who’s searching for you online”, “You Have 1 New Message,” and “You appeared in 4 searches this week,” exactly mirroring official LinkedIn emails and they also reference well-known companies such as American Express and Tesla to make it appear that the user is being headhunted by a major corporation. The emails have an HTML button to click that will direct the user to a website where LinkedIn credentials are harvested.

LinkedIn phishing campaigns can be highly effective, but as with all phishing scams, there are ways of blocking the attacks. The first is to ensure that an advanced email security solution is deployed to block the phishing emails at the gateway to prevent them from being delivered to inboxes. SpamTitan Plus uses machine learning techniques and predictive analysis to identify suspicious URLs in emails and provides time-of-click protection. If a link is found to be unsafe, a user will be presented with a block page containing additional information and further options.

SpamTitan Plus has 100% coverage of all current market-leading anti-phishing feeds, a 1.5X increase in unique phishing URL detections, and 1.6X faster phishing detections than the current market leaders, with 10 million net new, previously undiscovered phishing URLs added to the solution every single day.

It is also important to provide security awareness training to the workforce to teach employees how to identify phishing emails and to encourage following email security best practices. TitanHQ has created SafeTitan security awareness training to help train the workforce to be security titans. SafeTitan provides behavior-driven security awareness training tailored for the behaviors of individual employees, includes an extensive library of training courses, videos, and quizzes, and provides real-time intervention training combined with simulated phishing attacks. The solution is proven to reduce employee susceptibility to phishing attacks by up to 92%.

For more information on SpamTitan Plus and SafeTitan security awareness training, give the TitanHQ team a call and take the first step toward improving your defenses against phishing attacks.

BEC Scammers Use Virtual Meeting Platforms to Trick Employees into Making Fraudulent Wire Transfers

Business Email Compromise (BEC) is the leading cause of financial losses to cybercrime. The U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3) received 19,369 complaints about BEC scams in 2020, resulting in adjusted losses of $1.87 billion. While BEC crime ranked number 10 based on victim count, it topped the list in terms of the losses sustained by victims, with three times as much lost to the scams as the second-biggest loss to cybercrime – Confidence/romance fraud.

Business Email Compromise scams usually start with a phishing attack to gain access to email credentials. The attackers seek the credentials of the CEO, CFO, or another executive, and either target those individuals directly with spear phishing emails or compromise the email accounts of lower-level employees and use their email accounts to send phishing emails to the targeted individuals. Once the right credentials have been obtained, the executive’s email account is used to send messages to individuals responsible for wire transfers to trick them into making substantial wire transfers to attacker-controlled bank accounts. While these scams require planning and research, the time spent setting up the scams is well spent, as BEC attacks are often successful.

While BEC scams are usually conducted via email, BEC scammers are increasingly using virtual meeting platforms such as Microsoft Teams and Zoom in their scams. The scammers have taken advantage of the increase in remote working due to the pandemic and the popularity of virtual meeting platforms for communication and collaboration.

Once the scammers have access to the CEO’s email account, they identify their next target and send a request for a virtual meeting. When the target connects to the meeting, the scammer explains that they are having problems with their audio and video, so the meeting proceeds with the scammer on text chat. Oftentimes they will insert a picture of the CEO for added realism. The scammer then provides a reason for the out-of-band request, then asks the employee to make a wire transfer, either in the meeting or after the meeting via email.

The FBI has recently issued a warning to businesses about the increase in the use of virtual meetings for BEC scams, having observed an increase in the use of these platforms for BEC scams between 2019 and 2021. Scammers are also compromising employee email accounts and are inserting themselves into work meetings to gather information about the day-to-day processes at businesses. Since the scammers use genuine email accounts to connect, and audio/visual problems are relatively common, they are able to gather information and steal funds without being detected. The scammers also use compromised CEO email accounts to send emails to employees claiming they are stuck in a virtual meeting and unable to arrange an important wire transfer and ask an employee to initiate the transfer on their behalf.

There are several steps that businesses can take to improve their defenses against BEC attacks. Defending against these attacks should start with an advanced email security solution to block the phishing attacks that allow scammers to gain access to email accounts. SpamTitan has industry-leading detection of phishing URLs in emails and can prevent employees from visiting the web pages where credentials are harvested.

Security awareness training is important as some malicious emails bypass all spam filters. Employees need to be trained on how to identify scam emails. Security awareness training is concerned with creating a ‘human firewall’ to augment technical defenses and should make employees aware of BEC scams and how to identify scam emails from internal email accounts. TitanHQ has recently launched a new security awareness platform called SafeTitan to help businesses with training. SafeTitan is the only behavior-driven security awareness platform that provides real-time training to deal with threats targeting employees.

It is also recommended to implement policies and procedures that require secondary channels or two-factor authentication to verify requests for any changes to account information or atypical requests for bank transfers.

TitanHQ Completes Acquisition of Cyber Risk Aware

TitanHQ, the leading cybersecurity SaaS business, today announced its acquisition of Cyber Risk Aware. Established in 2016, Cyber Risk Aware is a global leader in security awareness and mitigation of human cyber risk, providing assistance to companies to train the workforce on how to protect the company network.

Cyber Risk Aware delivers real-time cyber security awareness training to staff in response to actual staff network behavior. This intuitive and real-time security awareness training reduces the likelihood users will be impacted by the latest threats such as ransomware, BEC attacks, and data breaches, whilst also enabling organizations to meet compliance obligations. Leading global businesses that trust Cyber Risk Aware include Standard Charter, Glen Dimplex, and Invesco.

The acquisition will further bolster TitanHQ’s already extensive cybersecurity offering. The combination of intelligent security awareness training with phishing simulations and TitanHQ’s advanced email protection and DNS security solutions creates a powerful, multi-layered cybersecurity platform that secures end users from compromise. This is the go-to cybersecurity platform for IT Managed Service Providers and internal IT teams.

“This is a fantastic addition to the TitanHQ team and solution portfolio. It allows us to add a human protection layer to our MSP Security platform, with a fantastic feature-rich solution as demonstrated by the high caliber customers using it. Stephen and his team have built a great company over the years, and we are delighted to have them join the exciting TitanHQ journey.” said TitanHQ CEO Ronan Kavanagh.

The solution is available to both new and existing customers and MSP partners at TitanHQ.com and has been re-branded as SafeTitan, Security Awareness Training. Cyber Risk Aware existing clients are unaffected and will benefit from improvements in the platform in terms of phishing simulation content and an exciting, innovative product roadmap.

Stephen Burke, CEO of Cyber Risk Aware, commented: “I am incredibly proud that Cyber Risk Aware has been acquired by TitanHQ, cybersecurity business that I have greatly admired for a long time. Today’s announcement is fantastic news for both our clients and partners. We will jointly bring together a platform of innovative security solutions that address the #1 threat vector used by bad actors that cause 99% of security breaches, “End User Compromise”. When I first started Cyber Risk Aware, my aim was to be the global security awareness leader in delivering the right message, to the right user at the right time. Now as part of TitanHQ, I am more excited than ever about the unique value proposition we bring to market”.

For more information on TitanHQ’s new Security Awareness Solution, visit www.TitanHQ.com/SafeTitan