There are several common misconceptions about email archiving which are preventing many businesses from creating an email archive. It is often only when email data needs to be recovered that businesses realize just how important an email archive is. Of course, by then it is too late.

In this post we debunk some of the email archiving myths and explain why email archiving is now essential for almost all businesses, regardless of industry or business size.

Misconception #1: An Email Archive is the Same as a Backup

The recent increase in ransomware attacks has highlighted the importance of creating backups of all critical data. An email backup contains all messages in a mailbox. If anything happens to that mailbox – it is encrypted by ransomware for instance – all email data can be recovered.

An email archive could serve the same purpose but differs in some very important ways. An email archive serves as a depository for all emails that are no longer required but need to be retained to meet state and federal data retention requirements.

If an email, group of emails, needs to be recovered, the messages can be located and restored very quickly. That is because the archive includes email metadata and the archive is searchable. A backup is intended for mass email recovery. Finding individual emails in a backup can be incredibly time consuming, costly, and difficult.

You can restore emails from a backup following a ransomware attack, but for eDiscovery and dealing with customer complaints, an email archive is required.

Misconception #2: Email Archives are Only Necessary in Highly Regulated Industries

The Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (SOX) requires organizations maintain an audit trail for 7 years, which includes email communications. However, it is not only organizations covered by SOX that must retain emails. Several states have enacted laws that require email data to be retained for a set period of time.

Further, no company is immune to litigation. The Federal Rules of Civil Procedure require email communications to be produced as part of eDiscovery. Those communications must be found and provided quickly, which is only possible with an email archive. The failure to produce emails can result in significant financial penalties.

Misconception #3: Email Archives Must be Stored On-Premises

There is no law that states email archives must be housed on-premises, but many companies mistakenly believe that this is necessary. They then purchase expensive hardware and software to create an on-premises email archive. This is often out of security concerns as IT departments feel they can better protect email data in house.

However, cloud service providers offer the same if not greater security, and their solutions require no hardware purchases nor ongoing hardware and software maintenance. Businesses are therefore paying unnecessarily high prices for their email archive.

There is no need to purchase expensive hardware to store sizable email archives and resources do not need to be made available to maintain the hardware and software. On-premises systems also tend to lack flexibility, whereas cloud-based email archives are extremely scalable. When greater capacity is required, additional storage space is always available.

Misconception #4: Long-Term Email Storage Increases Risk

Many businesses only retain emails for a limited period of time, such as 90 days, after which messages are permanently deleted. There is a common view that If an email is deleted, it cannot cause any harm. However, if a complaint is received or emails need to be produced for eDiscovery, the failure to produce those messages could see a company liable for data destruction.

If you want to meet compliance requirements, reduce costs, and be able to recover email data instantly, an email archive is required.

To find out more about the benefits of email archiving and for further information on ArcTitan. Contact TitanHQ today.